Flowers Tumblr Themes

Welcome to my blog! My name is Carri Daze but you call just call me Carri. You might have noticed I reblog random things. I don't reblog only certain things. In fact, this blog doesn't follow a certain theme. Enough about that though. Go ahead and talk to me. Hit that ask button and ask away. Submit whatever you want me to post! I love talking and meeting new people! Have a nice day! Love you!

spookymormon:

she-beastly:

spookymormon:

STOP SETTING OFF FIREWORKS IT IS JULY 6TH 

You can never stop celebrating freedom 

freedom my ass i can’t get married or have an abortion i hope the nsa sees this

artschoolglasses:

Favourite Fashion: Alexander McQueen, Fall 2008 RTW

pleatedjeans:

Seal with a data-logger on it’s head. [x]
"LOOK! LOOK! I’M A NARWAL!"

pleatedjeans:

Seal with a data-logger on it’s head. [x]

"LOOK! LOOK! I’M A NARWAL!"

history1970s:

hol y shit there it go!

egberts:

support group for ppl who used to be the same age as their favourite character but then got older

centralparknyc:

This post comes to us from our friends at The New York Academy of Medicine’s Center for History. They are located across Fifth Avenue from the Conservatory Garden, and find inspiration in our plantings for their Facebook and blog posts. Most recently they were inspired by our irises and wrote about the early American medical uses for this common native plant.

This week we’re enjoying irises in Central Park. Jacob Bigelow (1786-1879) included the native iris, Iris versicolor or Blue Flag, in his “American Medical Botany,” 1817-1820. Bigelow noted its use as a cathartic and diuretic. “American Medical Botany” was an early American botanical as well as an early instance of color printing in America. The plates were actually printed in color, rather than being colored by hand afterwards.

Thanks to NYAM for letting us republish these cool and informative posts! Be on the watch for more in the future!

centralparknyc:

This post comes to us from our friends at The New York Academy of Medicine’s Center for History. They are located across Fifth Avenue from the Conservatory Garden, and find inspiration in our plantings for their Facebook and blog posts. Most recently they were inspired by our irises and wrote about the early American medical uses for this common native plant.

This week we’re enjoying irises in Central Park. Jacob Bigelow (1786-1879) included the native iris, Iris versicolor or Blue Flag, in his “American Medical Botany,” 1817-1820. Bigelow noted its use as a cathartic and diuretic. “American Medical Botany” was an early American botanical as well as an early instance of color printing in America. The plates were actually printed in color, rather than being colored by hand afterwards.

Thanks to NYAM for letting us republish these cool and informative posts! Be on the watch for more in the future!

ereri-is-in-the-air:

Original:  ❀  by  shumm
[with permission from artist to repost] Please do not remove source :)

ereri-is-in-the-air:

Original:    by  shumm

[with permission from artist to repost] Please do not remove source :)